Garrow’s Law – interviews, links, and why isn’t it Sunday yet?

9 November, 2010 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment

First: thanks a lot to the visitors of this blog who are not as enthusiastic about the return of “Garrow’s Law” as I am for their patience. We’ll return to our regular 18th century / Georgian Royal Navy schedule very soon. A lot of interesting information plus the traditional Christmas Contest are lined up for posting, so please don’t abandon ship yet, or you might miss “Knit your own 18th Century Naval Officer”!

Second: Yes, I will again review each episode of “Garrow’s Law”, as I’ve done last year.  If you’re looking for the old reviews or anything else Garrow-related, please choose “Garrow’s Law” in the “category” field in the navigation bar.

Third: Oh you people of great taste who have come here looking for Andrew Buchan: please click here if you can’t find what you’re looking for.

THE HATS GET BIGGER, SO DO THE HEADS…

With the return of “Garrow’s Law” this upcoming Sunday (9pm, BBC1, HD) on the horizon, TV mags and online newsies all over the place are covering the show.

THIS MORNING: 10th November, ITV1, 10.30am – 12.30pm

Garrow’s Law heart-throb Andrew Buchan chats about the return of the drama series.

Heart-throb?! Cringe, groan, shudder. I’ll be working, but if you can, tune in!

TV CHOICE: Interview with Andrew Buchan

I’ve been making The Nativity for the BBC, playing Joseph which has been great — and as a bonus the costumes are so much easier to wear than the breeches and garters of Georgian times.

Try wearing stays and bum-pads for a day, dear Sir, then we can talk!

I’d also like to recommend once again the blog of Mark Pallis; it’s linked to in the navigation bar here on Joyful Molly. He just put up an interesting article about Garrow’s London.

For the historical background, please visit Old Bailey Online. Abandon all hope, ye who enter, for you shall get lost in the archives and stay in fascinated awe.

Last but not least: Garrow’s Law on the BBC website.

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Entry filed under: 18th century, garrow's law, resource, tv. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Pirates of the Caribbean fans: win Damian O’Hare’s autograph! Review: Garrow’s Law – The Bull is back in the China Shop #garrowslaw

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