And the Winner of Molly Joyful’s Joyful Yuletide Contest is…

16 December, 2009 at 10:48 pm 2 comments


KELSEY!

Just like most of those who mailed in for the contest, she knew the right answer to the question: “What was the name of Vice Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood’s dog?”

BOUNCE!

Congratulations! Your Christmas presents – the book “Naval Wives & Mistresses” by Margarette Lincoln, one Nelson Writing Set, a scented candle from L’Occitane and chocolate – are already on the way and will hopefully make it across the big pond in time for Christmas.

Some have inquired what “breed” Bounce was. Answer: nobody knows, but in the 18th century, there weren’t 20398305830 different dog breeds as you know them today. From Collingwood’s letters we can assume that Bounce was a large dog – so there goes the amusing thought of a French poodle aboard HMS Royal Sovereign!

Tsar Peter the Great and his pet dog (rumoured to be called "Fluffy").

Many thanks to everybody who participated in this contest. I promise that we’ll have another one soon!

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Entry filed under: 18th century, art, books, cuthbert collingwood, resource, royal navy. Tags: , , , , .

Molly Joyful’s Joyful Yuletide Contest! Age of Sail: Painting of Naval Battle – does anybody know anything about this?

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Anna  |  21 December, 2009 at 9:00 am

    Max Adams says in his biography of Collingwood that Bounce ‘might have been’ a Newfoundland – huge dogs, with a sweet temperament.

    James Anthony Gardner, in ‘Above and Under the Hatches’ describes the mayhem on board a ship with 86 Newfoundlands on board.

    And here is Lord Byron’s epitaph for his Newfoundland, Boatwain:

    Near this spot are deposited the remains of one who possessed Beauty without Vanity, Strength without Insolence, Courage without Ferocity, and all the Virtues of Man, without his Vices. This Praise, which would be unmeaning Flattery if inscribed over human ashes, is but a just tribute to the Memory of Boatswain, a Dog.

    Reply
    • 2. joyfulmolly  |  26 December, 2009 at 6:48 pm

      I agree with you that Bounce was a Newfoundland; most people I know would agree with you, actually. They seem to be the perfect dogs to have aboard a ship. There used to be a painting of Collingwood and his dog at “El Admiral” (Collingwood’s house on Menorca, now a hotel), I wonder what the perception of Bounce was by the painter…

      Reply

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