Archive for January, 2008

From the blog of Emma Collingwood

Emma has put the draft of the first three chapters of her next book online. It’s called “The Purser, The Surgeon, The Captain And His Lieutenant” and you can dowload it HERE.

Summary:

“The Purser, The Surgeon, The Captain And His Lieutenant – a tricky and charming cross-time tale about the tangled lives of four very different men, from the Age of Sail to modern day London. Featuring bravery, treachery, star-crossed love, revenge, the power of magic and overrated movie directors.”

Feedback can be left on her blog.

20 January, 2008 at 1:55 am Leave a comment

Documentary “Collingwood: Trafalgar’s Forgotten Hero”

Thanks to a truly wonderful friend (and a helpful mate at work), I could finally watch Max Adams’ 2005 documentary “Collingwood: Trafalgar’s forgotten hero”. Adams is the author of the book with the same title (highly recommended, a must-have. But regulars of my blogalready know this). I herewith apologise for thinking of Adams as an 80 year old professor with a white beard, glasses and a bowtie.

It’s difficult to squeeze Collingwood’s life and work in 45 minutes of TV, but it works, and it’s good. It gives an interesting insight into Collingwood’s life, and is easy to follow even for those who are part of the “Collingwho?” group. Adams does a good job and doesn’t torture us with dusty facts; he’s got a sense of humour (which also shows in the way he appreciates Collingwood’s humor) and seems to be quite comfortable in front of a camera. The man knows his business, and if you can catch a re-run on TV, please do so. It’s 45 well-invested minutes.

And yes, there are screencaps! There were scenes shot aboard HMS Tricomalee, HMS Victory, in Port Mahon and in Newcastle, at Collingwood House and around Morpeth. I’ve tried to sort the pictures, but there might be wrong labels. Should you spot a mistake, please let me know. I know the pubs in Newcastle, but that’s about it. 😉

Especially for Alex Beecroft I made some screencaps of an officer’s cabin. 😉

COLLINGWOOD AS A MIDSHIPMAN



COLLINGWOOD THROUGH THE AGES / FAMILY

The portraits of Collingwood show drastically how high the price was that he had to pay for serving his country. At the end of his life, he asked over and over again to be allowed to return home and retire, but was refused by King, Admiralty and everybody else who had any say. He wasn’t home for 8 years and never saw his family again.






Here we have the portraits of Collingwood’s wife and one of his daughers.


Collingwood and Nelson, his best friend.

OFFICER’S WARDROOM

My wardroom-scenes will hopefully read more realistic in future…





OFFICER’S CABIN

You really couldn’t swing a cat in there!




The lower decks didn’t have it quite as comfortable…


GALLEY AND PROVISIONS










Where there is rum, there will be seamen…

WHAT YOU NEED FOR A BATTLE






MAX ADAMS ALL OVER THE SHIP


Yes, I was tempted to turn this into an icon of questionable content, but I resisted. It’s a tailor taking measure. What else!



One of the original guns, taken from the “Royal Sovereign”, Collingwood’s ship during the Battle of Trafalgar.

PORT MAHON

According to Max Adams, Collingwood is more popular in Menorca than at home…







COLLINGWOOD HOUSE

This is the house Collingwood lived in on Menorca. It’s now a hotel and Collingwood’s spirit still seems to be there. Literally, if you believe those who claim they’ve heard his ghost.





HOME, SWEET HOME

“Then I will plant my cabbages again, and prune my goosberry trees, cultivate roses, and twist the woodbine through the hawthorn hedge…”





COLLINGWOOD’S JOURNAL

I wish I had such a neat hand. The following two pictures show an entry by Collingwood about Port Mahon; he even added a small sketch of the port.


Collingwood’s entry about the death of Nelson during the Battle of Trafalgar. You can see his signature/initials, “C.C.” in the second picture.



THE END OF A GREAT MAN

Captain’s log of Collingwood’s death. When he died, he hadn’t been home for eight years.

Collingwood always had some acrons with him, and planted them wherever he found a suitable place. He wanted to make sure that the navy would never run out of oak for ships.

There are many monuments for Collingwood…


… but if you ask me, this one is the most meaningful:


Take what you like, credit and comment are nice but not necessary. Just please: NO HOTLINKING!

Cheeyaz!

13 January, 2008 at 12:30 am 4 comments

Molly Joyful’s List Of Useful Resources has been updated!

Molly Joyful’s List Of Useful Resources

has been updated! Many new links for you, on all aspects of life in the 18th century. Be it dentistry or the splitting of prize money in the Royal Navy: here you’ll find it. Hopefully.

As usual, the list is neither complete (will never be), nor can I guarantee you that all information on those websites is 100% correct. To make navigation easier, I’ve marked the new links with a bright red “new” sign.

Also, I have added three new categories. If you should have a link you’d like to share, please post it here. Cheeyaz!

WordPress visitors, please note: some of these links lead to entries on LiveJournal rather than to the identical entry here on my blog. It would have been too time-consuming to change all links. If you’d rather see the entry on WordPress, just click the respective tags.

FASHION
MUSIC
SEXUALITY
MEDICAL SERVICES / HYGIENE
CHILDREN
ART
LIFE AT SEA
18TH CENTURY GENERAL (MOSTLY) BRITISH HISTORY
NAVAL HISTORY
LAW AND PUNISHMENT
RANKS AND UNIFORMS
SHIPS
LANGUAGE
PEOPLE
COMMUNITIES
BOOKS

New categories:

SOCIETY, DAILY LIFE
AUTHORS (Age Of Sail)
SHOPPING

Happy surfing! 🙂

10 January, 2008 at 5:18 pm Leave a comment

Resource: naval stamps and HMS Victory picture gallery

First: the wonderful Agie has sent me a card for Christmas, and on the envelope she put the most awesome stamps – if you like ships, you’ll love them!Age of Sail stamps

Second:  Alex Beecroft  has posted a link to the gallery with the 118 pictures her husband took aboard HMS Victory. I can really, really recommend that you’ll have a look at it, the details are amazing and you’ll appreciate your doctor much more once you’ve seen the instruments of the ship’s surgeon. Trust me on that.

Alex wrote that the curtains on Nelson’s cot had been embroidered by Emma Lady Hamilton – “a labour of love.”

Aww…

Photos taken on board HMS Victory at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard

Very special thanks to Alex and her husband for sharing!

6 January, 2008 at 10:30 pm Leave a comment

Resource/books: Officers’ accommodation

I’m currently writing a review of “Boys at Sea” by Professor B.R. Burg, which I will post later on. However, this excerpt here deserves its own entry, because it could be useful to many of us writers.

“(…) Admirals and captains occupied commodious cabins by shipboard standards. Lieutenants generally berthed in the wardroom, an area occupying the aft portion of the main deck and usually partitioned off from it by a temporary bulkhead. Down each side of the wardroom and between the guns, cabins were provided for the lieutenants. The partitions were of wood until 1757 when the Admiralty ordered they be made of canvas so that they could be quickly triced up when clearing the decks for action. The first lieutenant traditionally occupied the aftermost cabin on the port side. A door in the wardroom led to the quarter galleries where the officers’ toilets were situated. The cabins were scarcely large enough to hold their occupants, a sea chest, a cot or bedframe suspended from the beams, and a few personal belongings, but they did have privacy, a benefit increasingly prized by the middling and upper classes of the age. (…)”

Looks like I got it right in my book and my stories in general. Phew! I think I remember having read a story once where the first lieutenant was sleeping in a “king-sized bed” – wrong on so many levels! But certainly more comfortable… 😉

4 January, 2008 at 10:57 am Leave a comment

News: Emma Collingwood yahoo group/mailing list

Hello my dears!

As my first book has been published now (and just in case you wish to order a copy, EMMA COLLINGWOOD ONLINE is the place to go!) I have set up a special yahoo group/mailing list for my writing as “Emma Collingwood”. Please feel free to join; discussion is allowed and encouraged. Tell me what you like about my writing, tell me what you hate or just lurk and wait for updates. It’s all fine for me.


Click to join emmacollingwood
I do have my little black list with known trolls and stalkers here, though – joining is pointless for those belonging into one of these two categories. I’ll boot immediately.

See you “on the other side”.  🙂

Take care

Molly xx

3 January, 2008 at 10:51 am Leave a comment


FOLLOW ME!



Follow Me on Pinterest

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 340 other followers

MY LATEST BOOK

"THE RADIANT BOY"
Four Ghost Stories from the Age of Sail


Click here for a preview!
Click here to order!

RECOMMENDED AGE OF SAIL WRITING

EMMA COLLINGWOOD ONLINE

Love, Suspense and Sarcasm in the Age of Sail

ALEX BEECROFT
Adventure and Romance

OLD CUDDY - COLLINGWOOD 2010
Tribute to Admiral Lord Collingwood on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of his death at sea

OFFICIAL COLLINGWOOD 2010 WEBSITE
2010 is the year to celebrate a great man.

LINKS

MOLLY JOYFUL'S LIST OF USEFUL RESOURCES
Royal Navy, general 18th century history, biographies, books, art etc.


JOYFUL MOLLY ON LIVEJOURNAL
Same entries as on wordpress, but with additional RNotC fandom content (icons, updates on fanfic, meta etc.) and discussion.

RECOMMENDED BLOGS

GARROW'S LAW
Maintained by Mark Pallis, Legal and Historical Consultant on the BBC show

THE OFFICIAL WEBLOG OF WOLFGANG AMADÉ MOZART
THE DUTCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE'S GOSSIP GUIDE TO THE 18TH CENTURY
ONE MORE STITCH
Reproduction and historic knitting inspired by original garments, objects and patterns from the past.

GILLRAY'S PRINTSHOP OF HISTORICAL ABSURDITIES
Being one amateur historian's exploration of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Blog Stats

  • 386,980 hits
site stats